There is a lot of misinformation going around about the COVID-19 vaccines that are starting to circulate throughout our country, and around the world. Many individuals are unaware of how these vaccines work, making it more difficult to determine what information is incorrect. 

 

So, what are the facts about the COVID-19 vaccine?

 

According to the CDC’s website:

 

The Immune System—The Body’s Defense Against Infection

To understand how COVID-19 vaccines work, it helps to first look at how our bodies fight illness. When germs, such as the virus that causes COVID-19, invade our bodies, they attack and multiply. This invasion, called an infection, is what causes illness. Our immune system uses several tools to fight infection. Blood contains red cells, which carry oxygen to tissues and organs, and white or immune cells, which fight infection. Different types of white blood cells fight infection in different ways:

 

Macrophages are white blood cells that swallow up and digest germs and dead or dying cells. The macrophages leave behind parts of the invading germs called antigens. The body identifies antigens as dangerous and stimulates antibodies to attack them.

 

B-lymphocytes are defensive white blood cells. They produce antibodies that attack the pieces of the virus left behind by the macrophages.

 

T-lymphocytes are another type of defensive white blood cell. They attack cells in the body that have already been infected.

 

The first time a person is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, it can take several days or weeks for their body to make and use all the germ-fighting tools needed to get over the infection. After the infection, the person’s immune system remembers what it learned about how to protect the body against that disease.

 

The body keeps a few T-lymphocytes, called memory cells, that go into action quickly if the body encounters the same virus again. When the familiar antigens are detected, B-lymphocytes produce antibodies to attack them. Experts are still learning how long these memory cells protect a person against the virus that causes COVID-19.

 

How COVID-19 Vaccines Work

COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection, but with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future.

 

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to produce T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes after vaccination. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection.

 

Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity.

 

Types of Vaccines

Currently, there are three main types of COVID-19 vaccines that are or soon will be undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in the United States. Below is a description of how each type of vaccine prompts our bodies to recognize and protect us from the virus that causes COVID-19. None of these vaccines can give you COVID-19.

 

mRNA vaccines contain material from the virus that causes COVID-19 that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine. Our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there and build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future. 


Protein subunit vaccines include harmless pieces (proteins) of the virus that cause COVID-19 instead of the entire germ. Once vaccinated, our immune system recognizes that the proteins don’t belong in the body and begins making T-lymphocytes and antibodies. If we are ever infected in the future, memory cells will recognize and fight the virus.

 

Vector vaccines contain a weakened version of a live virus—a different virus than the one that causes COVID-19—that has genetic material from the virus that causes COVID-19 inserted in it (this is called a viral vector). Once the viral vector is inside our cells, the genetic material gives cells instructions to make a protein that is unique to the virus that causes COVID-19. Using these instructions, our cells make copies of the protein. This prompts our bodies to build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus if we are infected in the future.

 

Most COVID-19 Vaccines Require More Than One Shot

All but one of the COVID-19 vaccines that are currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the United States use two shots. The first shot starts building protection. A second shot a few weeks later is needed to get the most protection the vaccine has to offer. One vaccine in Phase 3 clinical trials only needs one shot.

 

The Bottom Line

Getting vaccinated is one of many steps you can take to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.  Protection from COVID-19 is critically important because for some people, it can cause severe illness or death.

 

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like masks and social distancing, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

 

Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing in Humble TX

Our healthcare providers are offering same-day results for COVID-19 testing in Northeast Houston, TX, for new and established patients without having to schedule an appointment or come into our office. All rapid COVID-19 tests will be conducted Monday-Friday between 6 pm and 8 pm. We provide these tests to individuals from the comfort and safety of their vehicles. We protect your safety by putting sanitation measures in place to prevent cross-contamination between patients. Drive-thru testing centers were developed as a way to minimize potential exposure to the highly contagious COVID-19 virus. Instead of sharing a waiting room with others who are potentially infected, patients will be able to remain safely in their own vehicles throughout the entire process. 

 

Wellspire Medical Group

Whether you have a medical concern you want to address with a physician or are seeking long term management and care for a condition you already have been diagnosed with, Wellspire is here for you. We believe every patient deserves a treatment plan that works for their specific needs and lifestyle. At the first sign of an issue, come into one of our two medical facilities. If you do not have an appointment, we will do our best to accommodate you at one of our locations. Wellspire Medical Group proudly serves Atascocita, Humble and surrounding areas. We have been part of Northeast Houston as the Mehta Medical Group for 30 years. Our name change reflects our broader scope of services. In other words, we are working hard to “Inspire Better Health!”

 

 

Wellspire Medical Group
8901 FM 1960 Bypass Rd. W
Suite 101
(281) 446-7173
https://www.facebook.com/wellspiremed